Showing posts with label disc brakes. Show all posts
Showing posts with label disc brakes. Show all posts

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Velo Orange Polyvalent 4

The Velo Orange Polyvalent in lilac (top) and deep emerald green (bottom). Both images courtesy of Velo Orange blog.
Velo Orange is currently having a presale on its updated Polyvalent frameset.  The retail price is $725, but the presale price is $675. VO expects the presale framesets to arrive in April 2018.

Velo Orange, based in Annapolis, Maryland, is a bike nerd's paradise: So many elegant parts and accessories!  Chris Kulczycki started the company in 2006.  Last year, Chris retired and sold the company to two of his employees, Adrian and Igor.  

With all those wonderful parts, you can build yourself an awesome bike.  It just so happens that Velo Orange sells framesets.

The Polyvalent frameset can be built into a do-it-all bike. Tom wrote about an earlier version of the frameset back in 2010. He wrote that the Polyvalent's "multi-purpose nature makes it perfect for those who can only have one bike." 

Ah, the search for "The One."  The bike that can do everything.  That's literally the idea behind the Polyvalent.  I don't speak French, but VO informs me that "Polyvalent" is French for "many forms."  Magnifique!

VO has been hyping this updated Polyvalent since, well, October 2016,  and November 2016, and October 2017.  They were excited! Now I see why.

This version has double eyelets so you can run your fenders and install your racks.  It's designed for wide 650b tires or even wider 26" tires.  It takes disc brakes. There's room for three water bottle mounts.  You can do what you want with this monster.

Here are the specs:

  • Frameset material: 4130 double butted chromoly steel
  • Fork: 1" threaded
  • Wheel Size: 650B or 26" 
  • Tire Clearance: 650B x 47mm, 26 x 2.3" (either with fenders)
  • Rear Spacing: 135mm
  • BB: English threaded 68mm
  • Brakes: IS mount disc, 160mm
  • Seatpost: 27.2mm
  • Front Derailleur Size: 28.6mm
  • Water bottle mounts: Triple on top of downtube, one set on seattube, one set on underside of downtube
  • Fender bosses: seat stay bridge, chainstay bridge, under fork crown
  • Rear Dropouts: Vertical with stainless steel replaceable hanger
  • Frame Eyelets: Double eyelets on rear dropouts for racks and fenders
  • Internal eyelets on seat stays
  • Fork Eyelets: Double eyelets on fork dropouts for racks and fenders
  • Triple thru-bosses on the blades for lowrider racks
  • Hourglass braze-on for Randonneur or Campeur Racks.
  • Rear Brake Routing: Easy internal routing for rear brake cable housing/hydraulic tubing
  • Ovalized top tube for lateral stiffness and easy shouldering
Geometry

Wednesday, December 27, 2017

Benno Ballooner




Benno Ballooner Men's and Women's 8. Courtesy: Clever Cycles
The Benno Ballooner is available with an 8-speed derailer or internal hub and comes with fenders and disc brakes. Clever Cycles in Portland, Oregon has it for $1,000. You can also find Benno bikes at Conte's in Washington, D.C. and Virginia.

Benno Baenziger co-founded Electra in 1993 (along with Jeano Erforth), which produced cruisers at a time when very few cruisers were available on the market.  In 2014, Electra was bought by Trek.  It's now apparent that Baenziger was not finished designing useful bikes for the rest of us.

The Ballooner, of course, gets its name due to its wide tires (26 x 2.35). Baenziger writes: "Personally, I am not a big fan of skinny tires. I believe that bigger tires provide for a better and more controlled ride."

You can read more about Benno bikes on the Clever Cycles Blog.

Benno offers the Ballooner in both derailer and internal hub versions. Here are the specs for the IGH version:

Frame6061 Aluminum Alloy Frame
ForkCRMO Fork with Investment Cast Lug Crown
Rims/wheelsDouble Wall Aluminum Rims
Tires26”x 2.35” Balloon Tires (60 TPI)
CranksetRetro Aluminum Crankset
Rear derailleurShimano Alfine Internal 8-Speed
BrakesShimano Hydraulic Disc Brakes
PedalsRetro Aluminum


Sunday, May 7, 2017

Bobbin Hummingbird


2017 Bobbin Hummingbird. All photos courtesy: Bobbin Bicycles Facebook Page

Bobbin has introduced two new 8-speed models for 2017: The Hummingbird (pictured above) and the Kingfisher, a diamond frame model.  It's available for preorder for £645 (about $839).

Bobbin, based in London, was founded 10 years ago and is cocky enough to call itself a "utopian brand."  Bobbin offers many attractive and practical bikes, and most come standard with racks, a chainguard or full chaincase, and fenders. 

The Hummingbird and Kingfisher come with front and rear battery-powered lights, Shimano Nexus 8-speed internal gear hubs, and hydraulic disc brakes. The frame is made from an alloy that Bobbin claims (in an instagram post) is a "MUCH lighter alternative to those serious German/Dutch commute bikes.").  Apparently, that means it's slightly under 30 pounds.  In "midnight blue sparkle," this is a beautiful bike.

The gears are inside.

The specs aren't available on Bobbin's website yet, but you can requeest more information by emailing Bobbin at info@bobbinbicycles.co.uk




Monday, November 28, 2016

Specialized AWOL Expert

The Specialized AWOL Expert is a do-everything bike. Photo courtesy: specialized.com
The Specialized AWOL Expert retails for $2,500.

If you follow bicycle retail, you've probably noticed some interesting models labeled "adventure," "bikepacking," "gravel" or "offroad touring."  These are bikes like the Soma Wolverine, the Salsa Marrakesh or Vaya, and Surly's Troll or Ogre. They take wide tires, they tend to be made from high quality steel, and they come with disc brakes. Basically, they're designed to handle the rough stuff while carrying a load.

Specialized's offering is pricey, but it has it all: dyanamo-powered lights (add it to Edwin's list!); fenders with mudflaps; front and rear racks; disc brakes; really wide (comes with 700x45) tires; and a many gear combinations.  You could ride across the continent on this, or you could just ride to work. It will do whatever it is you want it to do.

Here is a 2014 review from Bicycle Times. 

Here are the specs:
    • FRAME

      Heat-treated custom-butted Premium Cr-Mo tubing, internal light cable routing-ready, Adventure Geometry, post disc mount, fender/rack mounts, kickstand plate
    • FORK

      Butted premium Cr-Mo, unicrown, heat-treated
    • FRONT HUB

      Shimano Dynamo hub, Center Lock disc, 32h 
    • REAR HUB

      Shimano Center Lock disc, 32h
    • SPOKES

      Stainless,14/15g w/self-locking threads
    • RIMS

      Specialized 29" disc front, 6061-T6 aluminum, 32h
    • INNER TUBES

      Standard, Presta valve
    • FRONT TIRE

      Specialized Borough Armadillo, 60TPI, 700x45mm
    • REAR TIRE

      Specialized Borough Armadillo, 60TPI, 700x45mm
    • CRANKSET

      Shimano Tiagra
    • CHAINRINGS

      50/39/30T
    • BOTTOM BRACKET

      Shimano Tiagra
    • SHIFT LEVERS

      Shimano Tiagra
    • FRONT DERAILLEUR

      Shimano Tiagra
    • REAR DERAILLEUR

      Shimano Tiagra
    • CASSETTE

      Shimano, 10-speed, 11-36t
    • CHAIN

      KMC X10EPT Anti-Rust, 10-speed, w/reusable MissingLink
    • FRONT BRAKE

      TRP HY/RD, hydraulic disc, 160mm rotor
    • REAR BRAKE

      TRP HY/RD, hydraulic disc, 160mm rotor
    • HANDLEBARS

      Specialized Adventure Gear AWOL, alloy, 125mm drop, 70mm short-reach, 12-degree flare-out
    • TAPE

      Specialized Adventure Gear S-Wrap Canvas Tape
    • STEM

      Specialized, 3D forged alloy, 4-bolt, 7-degree rise
    • SADDLE

      Body Geometry Phenom Comp, hollow Cr-Mo rails, 143mm
    • SEATPOST

      Specialized CG-R, FACT carbon, single bolt, reflective, 27.2mm
    • SEAT BINDER

      AWOL forged alloy, CNC, stainless bolt, 29.8mm




You can ride it in the country; you can ride it in the city. Photo courtesy: specialized.com

Monday, July 11, 2016

GT Traffic 1.0

Traffic 1.0 is GT's top city bike.  Photo courtesy of  GT Bicycles.



The GT Traffic 1.0 is an aluminum 8-speed with disc brakes that retails for $660.

In a recent review, Adam Newman of the Bicycle Times sums up Traffic 1.0:

The Traffic is a solid platform for getting where you need to go and fun enough to take you a little bit beyond. While I will admit to being spoiled by some of the high-end bicycles we get to demo, I was impressed with the value of the build. Included are Shimano hydraulic disc brakes, full coverage fenders and even a bell. Add some lights and a lock and you’re off.

I would add that the Traffic 1.0 is built for wide tires.  It comes with 700 x 40c Schwalbe Roadcruiser tires that feature reflective sidewalls and puncture resistance.  These are quality tires -- I think they go for about $25 apiece -- and they should offer a cushy, flat-free ride and last for a long time.

Here are the specs:

Sizes:

XS, S, M, L, XL
Frame: NEW GT Traffic Triple Triangle 6061 series alloy, smooth welded, and hydroformed (TT,DT), forged drop-outs, chainstay disc mounts, all utility braze-ons
Fork: GT Traffic fork with hydroformed alloy raked legs, Disc brake tabs, rack and fender eyelets, steel steerer.
Chain: KMC Z72
Crank: SR Suntour XCC 48/38/28t
Bottom Bracket: Cartridge sealed
Pedals: New GT high impact nylon platform
Front Derailleur: Shimano FM-191
Rear Derailleur: Shimano Altus RD-M310 8spd
Shifters: Shimano Acera 8spd
Cog Set: Sunrace CSM55 8-spd 11-32t
Rims: Alex R500 disc specific aero profile
Tires: 700x40c Schwalbe Roadcruiser w/ puncture protection and reflective sidewalls
Hubs: F: Formula Disc 32h; R: Formula Disc 32h Freehub
Spokes: Stainless steel 14g
Nipples: Brass CP
Brake: Shimano BR-M355, Hydraulic Disc, W/ 160mm Rotor SM-RT56
Brake Levers: Shimano Hydraulic Disc Brake Lever
Handlebar: All New Melt forged Alloy Ahead type
Stem: New GT 3D forged Alloy Ahead type
Grips: GT Wing design
Headset: Threadless Ahead
Saddle: New GT Traffic saddle
Seat Post: Alloy one bolt seat pillar
Seat Clamp: Bolt type
Extras: Polycarbonate full wrap front & rear fender

*All prices and specifications subject to change without notice.
 


Wednesday, May 11, 2016

Scott Sub EVO 20

The 2016 Scott Sub Evo 20. Photo courtesy of Scott Sports.
The Scott Sub Evo 20 is currently on sale at Big Wheel Bikes for $800 (the MSRP is $1,000).

The first thing we need to do is add this to Edwin's list of bikes that come with lights. The front headlight is a Busch and Muller Eyc, which is powered by Shimano Deore dynamo hub.  The rear light is also from B and M.

Scott calls this a 30-speed.  It comes with a cassette with a range from an 11-tooth cog up to a mountain-tackling 34-tooth large cog.  The Sub Evo has an aluminum frame and fork and is equipped with Shimano disc brakes.  Overall, my impression is that this bike can handle a mix of terrain and climates.

The Sub Evo comes with fenders and a Racktime rearcarrier.  Racktime is a complete system which works with "snap it" accessories, as depicted in this youtube video.

Overall, this looks like a well-designed and thought-out bike.  There's a review of the Sub Evo 30 bike on youtube (a similar, but not the same, model).

Specs:

Frame



SUB Evo 6061 Tig welding





Fork
Sub Evo Alu Rigid Forged





Headset
VP-A41AC Semi integrated





Rear Derailleur
Shimano RD-T610 SGS 10 Speed





Front Derailleur
Shimano Deore FD-T610





Shifters
Shimano SL-T610





Brake Levers
Shimano BL-M355





Brakes
Shimano BR-M355





Crankset
Shimano FC-T611 Black 48x36x26 T





BB-Set
Included with crankset





Handlebar
JD-MTB 25AF





H'stem
JD-ST57A





Pedals
VP-615





Seatpost
JD JD-SP68T.1.





Seat
Syncros Urban Solution 2.5





Hub (Front)
Shimano Deore DH-3D37 Dynamo 32h





Hub (Rear)
Shimano FH-M615 CL 32h





Chain
KMC X10





Cassette
Shimano HG62 11-34 T





Spokes
Pillar Steel 14G





Rims
X12 Disc, 32h





Tires
Continental City Ride II





Lights
Front B&M EYC and Rear Integrated B&M Ilu Jr





Rack & Fenders
Racktime Standit w/ spring clamp
Curana C-lite D45 with integrated Rear Light





Approx weights in KG
15





Approx weights in LBS
33.07



Tuesday, February 16, 2016

Priority Eight


The Priority Eight is a belt-driven 8-speed. Photo courtesy of http://www.prioritybicycles.com

The Priority Eight has a "pre-sale" price of $800.  Priority anticipates that the bikes will be available by April 1.

According to Priority, the purpose of their bikes is "to make cycling more simple." Their first models were belt-driven "Classic" 3-speeds offered in a  diamond or step-through aluminum frame. Priority marketed these models as "low-maintenance" bikes available in black or white.

Since launching those classic models, Priority says it has received overwhelming demand for a bike with more gears, hence the Priority Eight.  The Eight, like the Classics, has a Gates carbon belt and an internal gear hub for a clean, low-maintenance ride.  It also comes with Tektro hydraulic disc brakes.





There has been some hype about the release of the Priority Eight.  You can read about it at Gizmodo and Bike Rumor.

The Priority Eight is available in three sizes: 17", 19" and 21.5". Here are the specs:

Component Description
Frame Ultralite 6061 T6 Aluminum
Fork Ultralite 6061 T6 Aluminum
Rims Double Wall Alloy, 36h
Front Hub Priority Alloy Sealed
Rear Hub Shimano Nexus 8 Disc
Spokes Black Stainless Steel
Shifter Shimano Nexus 8 Twist
Brakes Tektro HD-M330 Hydraulic Disc Dual Piston
Crankset Gates by FSA
Front Chainring 50t Gates CDN
Rear Cog 24t Gates CDN
Pedals Alloy
Bottom Bracket Sealed Cartridge
Seat Post 27.2 Alloy Microadjust 350mm
Belt Gates Carbon Drive, CDN
Saddle Velo dual density
Handlebar Stem Alloy
Handlebar Alloy, 31.8, 6 degree rise, 630mm
Headset Neco Alloy
Tires Continental Puncture Resistant 700x32
Fenders Alloy Paint Matched
Color Matte Charcoal Grey
Sizes 17", 19" and 21.5"
Weight Approx. 26lbs

Wednesday, August 5, 2015

Salsa Marrakesh


2016 Marrakesh with drop bars (top) and flat bars (bottom). Courtesy: Salsa's Culture Blog
New for 2016, Salsa Cycles is offering Marrakesh for around $1,600.

The Marrakesh looks like a really nice touring bike, at least the version with the Salsa Cowchipper bars (I can't imagine touring with flat bars, even if they do have a slight bend - you need multiple hand positions).  I like touring bikes (my main ride is a Miyata 1000 LT) because their ability to haul a heavy load over long miles necessarily makes them useful and versatile bikes.  It's why I'm a fan of Surly's LHT/Disc Trucker.

The LHT now has some serious competition.  The interesting thing is that both Surly and Salsa (as well as Civia, All-City and others) are owned by Quality Bicycle Products (QBP).  I can just imagine how that QBP board meeting went down:

QBP Head Honcho: OK, let's talk 2016 products.  Surly, go ahead.

Surly: Fat, fat, fat, fat. As you know, we're all about the fat bikes.  And we just keep getting fatter.  Like land-on-the-moon fat.

QBP Head Honcho: Fantastic. People love those fat bikes. OK, how about you Salsa?

Salsa: As you know, our slogan is "Adventure by Bike." So, new for 2016, we're putting out a touring bike called the Marrakesh.

Surly: Wait... what?

Salsa: It comes with disc brakes, room for wide tires (700 x 40 mm) and fenders, and includes a rear rack.

Surly: We already produce a touring bike with disc brakes. The Disc Trucker.

Salsa: We know!!! Where do you think we stole the idea from?  Anyway, we're "Adventure by Bike." That certainly includes touring bikes.  And you're... you know, fat.  Like, Ice Cream Truck fat.

Surly: This is starting to get insulting.  

QBP Head Honcho: Salsa has a point. Adventure by Bike is not just about riding trails.  It's also the open road.  OK, anything else?

Salsa: Yes, we also have this whole fat bike line-up we call Bear Grease. Because nothing says "Adventure by Bike" like fat bikes! Fat, fat, fat, fat.

Surly: *face palm*

End scene.


Of course, I'm not sure if that's how it really went down. Maybe QBP Head Honcho can provide us with some clarification.

Here are the specs on the 2016 Marrakesh:







Friday, July 10, 2015

Kona Minute

Kona's compact cargo bike is ready to haul your stuff. Courtesy: konaworld.com
The Kona Minute is an aluminum cargo bike with disc brakes that goes for about $1400.

Do you remember when we told you about Yuba's Boda Boda?  Basically, Yuba took its full-size cargo bike, the Mundo, and made it more compact so apartment dwellers and people dealing with tight spaces could own a cargo bike. It was a really good idea.  And that's what Kona is doing here.

Kona took its full-size cargo bike, the Ute, and made it more compact.  So it's a mini-Ute, or a MinUte. Get it?

This is a solid design for a cargo bike: hydraulic disc brakes; wide 40c tires; long chainstays and "wood deck" rear carrier; upright riding position; and lots of gear options.  The Ute bags are included.

Here are the full specs:

Frame Material Kona 7005 Aluminum Butted
Sizes 18", 20"
Rear Shock n/a
Fork Kona Project Two Aluminum Disc
Crankarms FSA Alpha Drive
Chainrings 26/36/Guard
B/B FSA Powerdrive
Pedals Wellgo Platform
Chain KMC HG53
Freewheel Shimano HG200 11-32t 9spd
F/D Shimano Acera
R/D Shimano Alivio
Shifters Shimano Acera
Brake Calipers Tektro HDC-M290
Front Brake Rotor Tektro HDC-M290 160mm
Rear Brake Rotor Tektro HDC-M290 160mm
Brake Levers Tektro HDC-M290
Headset TH ZST No.10
Handlebar Kona Handplant
Stem Kona Commuter
Seatpost Kona Commuter
Seat Clamp Kona Clamp
Grips Velo Ergo
Saddle Velo Plush
Front Hub Formula
Rear Hub Shimano M475L
Spokes Stainless 14g
Rims Freedom Cruz Disc
Front Tire Freedom Trekking 700x40c
Rear Tire Freedom Trekking 700x40c
Paint Color Charcoal w/Off White & Silver
Extras Wood Deck, Fenders, Kickstand, Ute Bags, Steering Stabilizer


Monday, July 6, 2015

Another Take On The Disc Brake

Shimano hydraulic disc brakes for road usage. Courtesy: http://cycle.shimano-eu.com
Back in 2012, after I noticed a surge in city and road bike models coming out with disc brakes, I offered A Short Take On The Disc Brake describing four situations where disc brakes might be preferable to rim brakes.

Over the last three years, Shimano, SRAM and others have continued to update and redesign brake levers and discs for road use.  For example, in August 2014, Shimano released its ST-RS685 compact hydraulic disc brake levers, which they promoted as providing "more stopping power with less effort."

Not everyone is enthralled by this technological shift toward hydraulic disc brakes.  In a recent exchange with David Hembrow about Trek's District bikes, I suggested that Trek had listened to him in designing the model. He responded:

Mr. Hembrow prefers drum brakes encased in the hub.  As he writes in his blog:

Enclosing the brake and gears leads to extremely high reliability. Neither the gears nor the brakes have required any maintenance, unlike my bike which has rim brakes and has required new brake pads. Not only rim brakes, but disc brakes also are not really low maintenance components. When used in winter, salt on the road causes the disc to rust, and brake pads need replacing fairly regularly. Drum brakes, or Shimano's roller brakes, are much more reliable than this. 

Drums brakes are not widely available in the U.S. bike market, although you frequently see Shimano roller brakes paired with Shimano Nexus hubs.  Still, Mr. Hembrow's point is well taken. Drum brakes work well, especially on flat terrain such as the streets of Amsterdam.  But what about his point about disc brakes? Should we avoid them because they require a higher degree of maintenance?

There are two categories of disc brakes: hydraulic and cable-actuated.  The latter category requires maintenance similar to rim brakes: replace the cables when they start to get stretchy.  My family owns several mountain brakes with disc brakes, and I haven't noticed any problem with rust despite riding on wet, muddy trails. 

Hydraulic brake systems, like those in an automobile, need to be flushed every so often.  John Allen, writing on sheldonbrown.com, cautions that "disc brakes are more complicated, expensive and difficult to maintain than rim brakes or drum brakes."  But he lists a number of advantages of disc brakes as well, including the fact that they allow heat to dissipate without damaging the tire and they don't wear rims.

If disc brakes are a factor in your bike purchase, I highly recommend reading all of John Allen's article on the subject as well as the links at the bottom of his article.


Monday, June 29, 2015

Trek Steel District and Chelsea 9

The Chelsea 9 (top) and Steel District (bottom) have an MSRP of $790.  Photos courtesy of trekbikes.com.
Trek is offering these steel bikes as part of its urban collection.  According to Trek, "District elevates the urban bike to a new level of refinement with a sexy mashup of style and function."

Whether or not they're a "sexy mashup," these models definitely represent an evolution from the Trek District we featured here seven years ago.  That bike was a belt-driven single-speed and Trek touted its "clean" look.  David Hembrow commented: "I question the practicality of a bike which is claimed to be 'clean' yet which has no mudguards (fenders)."

These 9-speed models retain the clean look but offer gears and Hembrow's desired mudguards.  The clean look is made possible by the 1x9 gearing, a set-up that I personally like (your mileage may vary).  The front basket and disc brakes are nice touches.

Here are the specs for the Chelsea 9:

Colors: Canary Yellow; White Gold
Frame: Trek Custom Steel Mixtie w/inboard rear disc brake mounts, rack & fender mounts
Fork: High-tensile steel
Sizes: 49, 53, 56cm
Front Hub: Formula DC20 alloy
Rear Hub: Formula DC22 alloy
Rims: 32-hole double-walled alloy
Tires: Bontrager AW1 Hard-Case Lite, 700x32c
Shifters: Shimano Acera M390, 9 speed
Rear derailleur: Shimano Acera
Crank: Forged alloy 3 piece, 45T
Cassette: SRAM PG-950, 11-32, 9 speed
Pedals: VP city-style alloy
Chain: KMC X9
Saddle:Bontrager H1 WSD
Seatpost: Bontrager Alloy, 2-bolt head, 27.2mm, 8mm offset
Handlebar: Bontrager Urban, 31.8mm, 25mm rise
Stem: Bontrager Race Lite, 31.8mm, 7 degree
Headset: 1-1/8" Threadless
Brakeset: Hayes CX Expert mechanical disc, 160mm rotors brakes, Tektro CL520 alloy levers
Grips: Custom District, lock-on
Extras: Front basket, chain keeper

And the specs for the District 9:

Colors: Blue Grey Metallic
Frame: Trek Custom Steel w/inboard rear disc brake mounts, rack & fender mounts
Fork: High-tensile steel
Sizes: 50, 54, 56, 58, 61cm
Front Hub: Formula DC20 alloy
Rear Hub: Formula DC22 alloy
Rims: 32-hole double-walled alloy
Tires: Bontrager AW1 Hard-Case Lite, 700x32c
Shifters: Shimano Acera M390, 9 speed
Rear derailleur: Shimano Acera
Crank: Forged alloy 3 piece, 45T
Cassette: SRAM PG-950, 11-32, 9 speed
Pedals: VP city-style alloy
Chain: KMC X9
Saddle: Retro Urban Saddle, Brown w/ Rivets
Seatpost: Bontrager Alloy, 2-bolt head, 27.2mm, 8mm offset
Handlebar: Bontrager Urban, 31.8mm, 25mm rise
Stem: Bontrager Race Lite, 31.8mm, 7 degree
Headset: 1-1/8" Threadless
Brakeset: Hayes CX Expert mechanical disc, 160mm rotors brakes, Tektro CL520 alloy levers
Grips: Custom District, lock-on
Extras: Front basket





Monday, September 22, 2014

Marin Fairfax SC6 DLX

The Fairfax SC6 comes in any color you want so long as it's black. Credit: marinbikes.com.
The Marin Fairfax SC6 DLX comes with an 11-speed Shimano Alfine internal gear hub, Gates carbon belt drive, hydraulic disc brakes, aluminum frame and fenders, an integrated rear rack, and a Super Nova E3 lighting system powered by a front dynamo hub. It retails for about $2400.

Edwin mentioned this bike when he did his roundup of bikes that come with lights, aka, Lights for the Rest of Us.  Unlike the Trek Lync, the Fairfax SC6 light system is battery free.

Here are the specs:

Frame: Series Three 6061 Aluminum, 700c Wheels, Eccentric Bottom Bracket, Relieved Head Tube, Internal Cable Routing, Post Mount Disc Specific Forged Dropouts, Belt Drive Compatible

Front Fork: RFE Carbon with Alloy Steerer tube

Rear Suspension: Drive Train Specs

Crankset: Shimano Alfine With 50t Gates CenterTrack Front Sprocket and CNC Ring Guard

Shift Lever: Shimano Alfine 11 Rapid Fire Plus Derailleur

Cassette: Gates CDX CenterTrack 22t CNC Stainless Steel Rear Sprocket

Bottom Bracket: Shimano HollowTech II

Integrated Chain: Gates CDX CenterTrack Belt, 115 Tooth

Hub Rear: Shimano Alfine 11 Speed Internal Gear Hub, 409% Gear Ratio
 
Hub Front: Shimano Alfine Dynamo, 6V-3W

Rim: Maddux SR300 700c, 30mm Tall with Sleeve Joint, 32 Hole

Spokes Nipples: 14 Gauge Black Stainless

Tires: Continental Sport Contact II 700x32c with Safety System Puncture Protection And Reflective Sidewall

Brakes Front: Shimano T445 Hydraulic Disc, 6” Rotor

Brakes Rear: Shimano T445 Hydraulic Disc, 6” Rotor

Brake Levers: Shimano T445 Hydraulic Cockpit

Handlebar: Double Butted Flat Top, 6061 Alloy, OS-31.8mm, 700mm Wide

Grips: Ergon GS1 Locking Ergonomic

Stem: Marin OS Alloy Threadless, 31.8mm Bar Clamp

Headset: FSA Orbit C, 1 1/8

Seatpost: Marin 3D Forged with Alloy Micro Adjust, 15mm Offset, 400mm Length

Saddle: Ergon SM30 Comp Accessories

Pedals: CNC Sealed Bearing, 2.5mm pin

Rack: Racktime Custom Integrated Match-It QL3, With Snap-It and QL3 Mounting Systems For Ortlieb And Racktime Accessory Mounting

Monday, September 8, 2014

Trek Lync



The Trek Lync has lights front and back. Photos courtesy of Trekbikes.com

The 2015 Trek Lync 5 27-speed will go for about $1320; the Lync 3 9-speed will go for around $990. Trek calls the Lync a "dedicated, low-maintenance, tricked-out commuter bike."

Let's start by giving Trek some credit for finally producing an off-the-shelf bike with an integrated light system. These are not dynamo hub powered lights, but are instead powered by a lithium ion battery that is rechargeable by USB. It will be interesting to see the longevity of these batteries. 

In any event, when Edwin did his comprehensive post "Lights for the Rest of Us," Trek was one of the big guys that was noticeably absent from the bikes with lights market. So, welcome aboard Trek.

I have minor criticisms of the Lync model. First, why don't they come with integrated racks, like the apparently discontinued Trek Belleville.  And why can't it be as stylish as the Belleville? And, as always, I'm not a fan of straight bars that only allow one hand position.

The bike media has greeted the Lync with enthusiasm, including this preview by the Bicycle Times.

Specs for the Lync 5:

Colors Matte Trek Black
Frame Alpha Gold Aluminum with Lync on-board lighting system, DuoTrap S compatible, internal cable routing
Fork Lync, Alloy
Sizes 15, 17.5, 20, 22.5, 25"
Front Hub Formula DC20 alloy
Rear Hub Formula DC22 alloy
Rims Bontrager TLR disc, 32-hole
Tires Bontrager H2 Hard-Case Lite, reflective, 700x32c
Shifters Shimano Acera M390, 9 speed
Front derailleur Shimano Acera
Rear derailleur Shimano Deore
Crank Shimano Acera M391, 48/36/26 w/chainguard
Cassette Shimano HG20, 11-34, 9 speed
Pedals Wellgo track-style alloy
Chain KMC X9
Saddle Bontrager H1
Seatpost Bontrager SSR, 2-bolt head, 27.2mm, 12mm offset
Handlebar Bontrager Low Riser, 31.8mm, 15mm rise
Stem Bontrager Elite Blendr, w/computer & light mounts, 31.8mm, 7 degree
Headset Slimstak, semi-cartridge bearings, sealed
Brakeset Shimano M355 hydraulic disc
Grips Bontrager Satellite Elite, lock-on, ergonomic
Extras Lync front and rear lights, full-coverage color-matched fenders, chain keeper



Friday, May 9, 2014

BULLITT Cargo Bike

BULLITT Red
While a number of North American designers have developed "longtail" cargo bikes, where the kids or freight are carried in back, the Dutch and Danish prefer keeping things up front. LARRY VS HARRY, a shop in Copenhagen, designed the BULLITT to be a relatively light-weight and speedy way to transport cargo and children.

Most of the models come standard with a 7 or 8-speed internal gear hub in the rear, disc brake in the front, a custom kick-stand and fenders. Derailleur gearing and e-assist are also available. The riding position is somewhat leaned-forward, especially for taller riders, and there is no step-thru frame option. The modern-looking aluminum frame is meant to be extra stiff, to prevent twisting even with heavy loads.


I had a chance to test-ride this bike alone and with kids in the front (in a version that has an added kid seat); the handling is similar to a road bike, with responsive (or twitchy) steering which takes a minute to get used to. Disc brakes are a good idea on a bike meant to carry weight at high speeds.

These bikes have been reviewed by:
Totcycle
Josh Volk
Lovely Bicycle
Momentum Magazine

Many of the Bullitts in the USA are sold by Splendid Cycles in Portland, Oregon, but they are also available in a few other cities. The bike comes as shown, but most people pay for a child seat or cargo box to be added, and an electric bike version with a lithium battery pack is also very popular. A frameset costs $2350 alone. The complete bike with Alfine 8-speed hub is $3500. The e-bike version with a BionX rear hub is a grand more, $4500. Dynamo hubs and lights are an option.


Due to the relatively narrow cargo deck (no wider than the handlebars), one child can fit easily, but only small kids can double up.  Winther, another Danish bike company, makes an adaptation of the Bullitt frame called the Wallaroo, which has a wider child carrier included, to fit two kids side-by-side. However, there is only one current USA dealer, JC Lind in Chicago.
BULLITT Specifications (ALFINE 8 version):

shifterAlfine 8 speed
rear drivetrainAlfine 8 speed
crankAlfine
bottom bracketAlfine
chainSRAM 9-speed
brake leversAvid
brakes frontAvid BB7
brake rearAvid BB7
rotorsShimano centerlock
HeadsetFSA Pig
stemCivia Midtown 25.4
handlebarCivia
gripsCivia Ergo
seatpostFSA
saddleLvH
pedalWellgo Platform
fenders20″ front/26″ rear black
tire frontSchwalbe Marathon 20×2
tire rearSchwalbe Marathon 26×2
tube frontSlime tube 20″
tube rearSlime tube 26″
rim stripSchwalbe rim liners
wheel frontAlfine/Alex DM24 rim/stainless spokes
wheel rearAlfine/Alex DM24 rim/stainless spokes


BULLITT Geometry:


Friday, May 2, 2014

Kinn Cascade Flyer

Kinn is new company with 1 model of family oriented bike in Oregon. The frame, wheels and many other parts are made locally.

The Cascade Flyer is part of a new class of bikes called "mid-tails", shorter and lighter than a "long-tail" cargo bike, such as Yuba Mundo or an Xtracycle, but long enough to carry a kid plus a couple of panniers. And it comes with everyone you need, except for lights: integrated rack, fenders, chainguard, dual kickstand, 8-speed internal gear hub, disc brakes and a leather saddle.


The designer wanted a bike that was sturdy and long enough to carry his grandkids along with a couple of bags of groceries, but short and light enough to ride to work and around town. It also is just short enough to fit on a bus rack for bikes, with the front wheel turned backwards: this explains the curve in the down-tube. The geometry is designed to handle similarly to a modern hybrid or city bike, with 72 degree frame angles, and full-size 700c wheels (built by hand in Portland).

Front wheel twists so the bike can fit a standard bus rack
The 8-speed Alfine IGH version costs $2350 for a complete bike as shown. A 27-speed derailleur option is the same price. Unfortunately, there is no small size; riders shorter than 5'2" are out of luck, but medium to tall people should fit.

This can be a good option for a person who wants a made-in-the-USA, fully equipped bike that can haul groceries and a kid, and also serve as a commuter bike and city bike. I wish the complete build included dynamo lights. Considering that the wheels are hand-built locally, it may be possible to add this on to the order for an additional cost. If not, the front wheel should sell easily on Ebay.

You also get some fancy extras, like the bamboo rack top with hidden lockbox:


This bike has been reviewed by Lovely Bicycle and covered by Bikeportland

Specs:
FRAME FORK
Hand made in Portland Oregon from heat-treated Cro-moly steel tubing. Fits tires up to 1.75″ wide (700x42mm) with fenders.
Fork has eyelets for front rack at dropout and mid-blade.
Sizes
Regular  (5’2”-5’10”)  or  Large (5’8”-6’4”)
Three Colors
Sardinian Sea, Red Earth, Clean Slate
Built-in Rear Rack
Rated for 130lbs (60kg) to easily carry a child and groceries.
21″ rack with bamboo deck.
Child Transport
Built-in Yepp EasyFit window for direct child seat mounting.
Integrated footpeg mounts.
Cargo Capacity
Pannier rails fit standard panniers even with a Yepp child seat attached
 GEARING
27 SPEED DERAILLEUR
ALFINE 8 SPEED INTERNAL
Cranks
Shimano triple 44-32-22
Kinn 36t Aluminum Crankset with Ring-guard
Cassette
Shimano 9 spd 11-34 Cassette.
Shimano Alfine 8-speed Internal hub
with 20T cog
Shifter
Shimano Alivio 430 trigger shifter
Shimano Alfine Trigger

WHEELS
Hand-built in Portland by Sugar Wheelworks
Rims & spokes
Alex DM-18 700C silver rims, with 36 14G stainless steel spokes
Hubs
Shimano SLX  or Shimano Alfine hubs
Tires
700c x 35mm, with reflective sidewall and puncture guard
Brakes & Levers
Avid BB5 mechanical disk brakes for all weather stopping power
Levers
Tektro 3 finger levers
Pedals
VP-560 silver alloy platform pedals
Handlebar, Grips & Bell
Alloy touring/city bar and lacquered cork grips and classic brass bell
Saddle
Velo comfort saddle
Seatpost
Silver alloy 27.2mm x 350mm
Stem
Polished aluminum stem. 90mm (small) 110mm (large)
Fenders
Alloy full coverage fenders with mud flaps and rear reflector.
Other:
Chainguard, double kickstand, footpegs